AFSCME Council 18

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There are over 50,000 Union-family voters we must reach. So far, over 100 of your fellow union members have volunteered. We've held 3,700 phone conversations and knocked on 1,100 doors, but it's not enough!

50,000 votes is enough to change the face of state politics and help New Mexico return to a more working family-friendly agenda. With your help, we can knock on EVERY UNION DOOR, speak with every union family member, and WIN big in NOVEMBER!


Everyone is coming out to vote in this election, but we can't win without your help! get registered to vote (ONLINE, here and now)

AFSCME members and retirees can make $12/hour volunteering to help elect pro-worker state legislators, a secretary of state, and president.


CLICK TO VOLUNTEER!




Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Belen, and Las Cruces Labor programs all run on the same schedule:

Phone Banking - Monday through Thursday: 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Door to Door Canvass - Saturdays meet at 9:30 for breakfast and hit the doors 10:00 am - 1:00 pm


TWO MORE PUBLIC SAFETY UNITS ORGANIZE WITH AFSCME COUNCIL18

New Public Safety Locals Will Continue to Raise Bar for New Mexico


It has been a busy summer for AFSCME Council 18 organizers and the public safety workers who united to organize under the AFSCME flag, ultimately bringing strong worker rights to more than 106 public safety officers!

In a two-day election on July 25 and 26, Rio Arriba County Detention Center Officers voted 12 to 2 to join AFSCME Council 18, covering 18 detention center officers.  And on August 18, Sandoval County Detention Center officers voted 40 to 4 to join Council 18, covering 56 officers, with an additional 32 officers on probation.          

The Rio Arriba County election was conducted by the New Mexico Public Employee Relations Board (PELRB), which officially certified the election results at their  August 9 board meeting. The Sandoval County election was conducted by the County Clerk’s office, in accordance with the Sandoval County Labor Management Relations Ordinance, and was certified by its Labor Management Relations Board on August 23.      



Sandoval County Detention Officers gather following their victorious union election. (L to R) Anita Apodaca, Dora Castillo, Connie Derr - AFSCME Council 18 Executive Director, and Olga Esquibel

“Both of these elections were overwhelming wins for the officers and for AFSCME.  The results tell you that in order to make a stronger, better–run facility, public safety officers must be at the table and in the discussion.  With the extremely high vacancy rates and, in the case of Sandoval County where one-third of the officers have less than a year of experience on the job, the stability of a union contract will go along way to help with the retention and recruitment problems,” said Connie Derr, Council 18 Executive Director. “We are thrilled to welcome the public safety officers in Rio Arriba and Sandoval counties to the AFSCME family!"

Following these successful elections, AFSCME is gathering input from all of the bargaining unit-eligible officers for the first contract, which lay out all terms and conditions of employment.  

AFSCME Council 18 Senior Staff Representative Rocky Gutierrez, who has bargained more than 25 contracts for Council 18 local unions, will serve as chief spokesman for the AFSCME Rio Arriba County bargaining team.  “While County Manager Tomas Campos has publicly reported the county will spend (at least) $30,000 to fight the workers’ issues in negotiations, tax-payer dollars are better invested in its personnel and facility.”

Rio Arriba County Senior Detention Officer and AFSCME organizing committee member, Guy Jordan said that officers have been working towards this victory for 14 years.

“The County had been very skilled at disrupting our previous organizing efforts,” said Jordan, a 14 year officer for Rio Arriba County. “Commissioners and upper level managers are upset we’ve organized, and have said that our ‘union will cause nothing but problems.’ For the other officers and myself, the years-long problems of denying us overtime pay, failing to provide needed training, or avoiding the need to create vital safety policies, those are the only problems that matter and that we’ll be addressing through our union.”

Another RACDC officer and organizing committee member, Santana Bustamante, pointed to other health and safety concerns to be addressed through the bargaining process. “Staffing issues have caused the county to hold officers over for 24 hour shifts.

Read more >>>

In some districts, the election can come down to a handful of votes. You have the power to make sure our UNION VOTE MATTERS!

AFSCME members and retirees can make $12/hour volunteering to help elect pro-worker state legislators, a secretary of state, and president.

AFSCME members have the VOTE power needed to shift the NM House of Representatives back into the hands of working family friendly candidates. We all know what that can translate into: properly funded public services, fair raises, protected retirement, safe staffing levels, an education system that works for New Mexicans, and the end to Governor Martinez's free-pass to mismanage our taxpayer dollars.

Everyone is coming out to vote in this election, but we can't win without your help!

CLICK TO VOLUNTEER!




Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Belen, and Las Cruces Labor programs all run on the same schedule:

Phone Banking - Monday through Thursday: 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Door to Door Canvass - Saturdays meet at 9:30 for breakfast and hit the doors 10:00 am - 1:00 pm


AFSCME New Mexico Public Safety members helped to produce this documentary about the true spirit of law enforcement in America.


 

Local 601 President Adam Keck and Local 923 President Sammy Marquez assisted in production for the New Mexico filming, recruited community members to appear in the filming, and appear in the final production.


Proud To Protect and Serve

AFSCME Law Enforcement Documentary

AFSCME Council 18 is glad to share this film with you today in honor of National Police Week, and in memory of dedicated Peace Officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty.

Peace Officers Memorial Day is May 15th.



In Unity


 

We know that the road has been long, that change has come too slow, and that Income Support Division (ISD) staff are under unacceptable pressures to do their jobs in the face of systematic ambush.

AFSCME has send this letter to the USDA requesting they investigate the systemic failures that have gone unaddressed by the Martinez administration for too long.

CLICK to DOWNLOAD the AFSCME letter (PDF).

CLICK here to READ about the April 28 Court case where New Mexico Center for Law and Poverty is requesting a Federal Monitor to oversee ISD. AFSCME members and ISD staff are under federal subpeona to reveal the truth of what is happening within the system.

Watch this page for updates following the Federal Court hearing.

Read more >>>


AFSCME Council 18 represents more than 15,000 public employees across New Mexico. We perform many of the state's most important jobs—from childcare providers to corrections officers—and work to make sure our rights, our families and our communities are protected. To learn more about our union and meet our members, please take a moment to watch the following video. 

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